Posts in PHILOSOPHY
Extreme Downtime

If you have the opportunity, a useful experiment is to ask some high performers a couple of questions. 

  1. Do good ideas come to you when you're deeply engaged in work or when you're totally relaxed and doing something else?
  2. Do you actively (or inactively) use engagement and relaxation as ideation strategies? If not, why not?
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Wait for the pushback

Before I explain an interesting exercise, I have to say that it only makes sense if you actually do it as you're reading this. Otherwise, you know the outcome but not your outcome. Anyway, I'll leave it up to you...

Here's the exercise: Put your hands together in front of your body in a prayer position as seen below. Then start to push with your right hand for 3 seconds. What happens?

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Favourite quotes about money

Too many people spend money they haven’t earned, to buy things they don’t want, to impress people they don’t like. – Will Rogers

Do not value money for any more nor any less than its worth; it is a good servant but a bad master. – Alexander Dumas

Money can’t buy happiness, but neither can poverty. – Leo Rosten

It's nonsense to say money doesn't buy happiness, but people exaggerate the extent to which more money can buy more happiness. - Daniel Kahneman

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Google's highly unlikely success story

“Do you know what Google did?”.

You’ve heard it said before as if it’s describing some game-changing business strategy that nobody else thought of at the time. The reality was much different with a myriad of complicated factors involved, many of which were totally unpredictable. Apple is the other classic story that is presented as inevitably successful, after the fact of course. In reality, many occurrences were entirely dependent on fate, not faith - as Apple commentators would have you believe. The problem with the real success stories is that they are complicated to understand, not quite as inspiring, and seemingly impossible to reproduce.

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Avoiding Peter’s principle

In his book published in 1969, Laurence Peter proposes the Peter Principle: "In a hierarchy, every employee tends to rise to his level of incompetence.”

Many promotion decisions are beyond logic, such as promoting an engineer to a manager because they are an excellent engineer. The decision is made based on the employee’s performance in an engineering role, but engineering and management are completely different sets of skills and should be treated as such.

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5 Movies with awesome lessons about following dreams

Brad Pitt’s character, Tyler Durden, holds a gun to the head of a convenience store assistant while asking “WHAT DID YOU WANT TO BE?”. Pitt’s character is obviously using a violent threat, but in an unusually encouraging way. He wants the assistant to follow his dreams so much so that he threatens to kill him for not following through. When the assistant eventually answers that he’d like to “veterinarian”, but that there’s “too much schooling”, Pitt’s character gives him an ultimatum to follow his dreams. Not the typical example of encouragement.

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